Thuggizzle Cares Breast Cancer Awareness

Thuggizzle Cares Breast Cancer Awareness

Did you know

 An average of 33 percent of cancer patients have trouble paying medical bills and 43 percent report skipping treatments or not filling prescriptions because of the cost. Paying for breast cancer screening and treatment is a top concern. These worries affect both those without health insurance as well as those who are under-insured, meaning that they don't have adequate coverage to pay their bills in the event of a major medical problem. In addition, one in five cancer patients with insurance will use up all or most of their savings during the course of treatment. The overall cost for treating a typical breast cancer will top $50,000 or even $100,000.  

Stages of Breast Cancer

Ductal carcinoma in situ breast cancer awareness information Thuggizzle Cares

Ductal carcinoma in situ

 Also known as DCIS is a noninvasive condition in which abnormal cells are found in the lining of a breast duct. The abnormal cells have not spread outside the duct to other tissues in the breast. In some cases, DCIS may become invasive cancer and spread to other tissues. At this time, there is no way to know which lesions could become invasive. 

Lobular carcinoma in situ breast cancer awareness information Thuggizzle Cares

Lobular carcinoma in situ

 Also Known as LCIS is a condition in which abnormal cells are found in the lobules of the breast. This condition seldom becomes invasive cancer. However, having LCIS in one breast increases the risk of developing breast cancer in either breast. 

Paget disease breast cancer awareness information Thuggizzle Cares

Paget Disease

 Paget disease of the nipple is a condition in which abnormal cells are found in the nipple only. 

stage 1 breast cancer awareness information Thuggizzle Cares

Stage 1

 Stage 1 Breast Cancer is divided into stages 1A and 1B. In stage 1A, the tumor is 2 centimeters or smaller and has not spread outside the breast. In stage 1B, no tumor is found in the breast or the tumor is 2 centimeters or smaller. Small clusters of cancer cells (larger than 0.2 millimeter but not larger than 2 millimeters) are found in the lymph nodes. 

Stage 2A breast cancer awareness information Thuggizzle Cares

Stage 2A

 No tumor is found in the breast or the tumor is 2 centimeters or smaller. Cancer (larger than 2 millimeters) is found in 1 to 3 axillary lymph nodes or in the lymph nodes near the breastbone (found during a sentinel lymph node biopsy) 
or
The tumor is larger than 2 centimeters but not larger than 5 centimeters. Cancer has not spread to the lymph nodes. 

stage 2B breast cancer awareness information Thuggizzle Cares

Stage 2B

 Tumor is *larger than 2 centimeters but not larger than 5 centimeters. Small clusters of breast cancer cells (larger than 0.2 millimeter but not larger than 2 millimeters) are found in the lymph nodes; or

*larger than 2 centimeters but not larger than 5 centimeters. Cancer has spread to 1 to 3 axillary lymph nodes or to the lymph nodes near the breastbone (found during a sentinel lymph node biopsy); or

*larger than 5 centimeters. Cancer has not spread to the lymph nodes. 

stage 3A breast cancer awareness information Thuggizzle Cares

Stage 3A

 No tumor is found in the breast or the tumor may be any size. Cancer is found in 4 to 9 axillary lymph nodes or in the lymph nodes near the breastbone (found during imaging tests or a physical exam)

* The tumor is larger than 5 centimeters. Small clusters of breast cancer cells (larger than 0.2 millimeter but not larger than 2 millimeters) are found in the lymph nodes; or

* The tumor is larger than 5 centimeters. Cancer has spread to 1 to 3 axillary lymph nodes or to the lymph nodes near the breastbone (found during a sentinel lymph node biopsy). 

stage  3B breast cancer awareness information Thuggizzle Cares

Stage 3B

 In stage 3B, the tumor may be any size and cancer has spread to the chest wall and/or to the skin of the breast and caused swelling or an ulcer. Also, cancer may have spread to:

up to 9 axillary lymph nodes or
the lymph nodes near the breastbone.
Cancer that has spread to the skin of the breast may also be inflammatory breast cancer. See the section on Inflammatory Breast Cancer for more information. 

stage 3C breast cancer awareness information Thuggizzle Cares

Stage 3C

 In stage 3C, no tumor is found in the breast or the tumor may be any size. Cancer may have spread to the skin of the breast and caused swelling or an ulcer and/or has spread to the chest wall. Also, cancer has spread to:

* 10 or more axillary lymph nodes 

*Lymph nodes above or below the collarbone 
or
*Axillary lymph nodes and lymph nodes near the breastbone.
Cancer that has spread to the skin of the breast may also be inflammatory breast cancer. 

stage 4 breast cancer awareness information Thuggizzle Cares

Stage 4

 In stage IV, cancer has spread to other organs of the body, most often the bones, lungs, liver, or brain. 

Important Information

Thuggizzle Cares Breast cancer awareness

Why regular breast exams are important

 Early breast cancer usually does not cause symptoms, as the cancer grows, symptoms may include: 


  •  Breast lump or lump in the armpit that is hard, has uneven edges, and usually does not hurt 
  •  Change in the size, shape, or feel of the breast or nipple -- for example, you may have redness, dimpling, or puckering that looks like the skin of an orange 
  •  Fluid coming from the nipple -- may be bloody, clear to yellow, green, and look like pus 
  •  Men can get breast cancer, too. Symptoms include breast lump and breast pain and tenderness.
     

When to see a physician

 See your physician if you discover any new breast changes, changes that persist after your menstrual cycle, or changes that concern you. Conditions that should be checked by a physician include:


  •  An area that is distinctly different from any other area on either breast 
  •  A lump or thickening in or near the breast, or in the underarm that persists through the menstrual cycle 
  •  A change in the size, shape, or contour of the breast 
  •  A mass or lump that may feel as small as a pea 
  •  A marble-like area under the skin
  •  A change in the feel or appearance of the skin on the breast or nipple (inverted, dimpled, puckered, scaly or inflamed red, warm or swollen) 
  •  Bloody or clear fluid discharge from the nipples 
  •  Redness of the skin on the breast or nipple 

Interesting facts and statistics

  •   The United States has the most cases of breast cancer in the world. 
  •  30 minutes of exercise 5 days a week can cut cancer risk by 20%. 
  •  About 1 in 8 women in the U.S will develop invasive breast cancer within their lifetime. 
  •  In the U.S., an average of 112 women die of breast cancer every day, or one every 15 minutes.
    but most importantly... 
  •  There are currently over 2.5 million breast cancer survivors living in the United States.
    Lets keep this number growing! 

Underarm Pain

 You know how the lymph nodes in your neck and throat can feel sore when you have the flu? The same thing happens to the lymph nodes in your armpit, because that's where breast cancer spreads first, by way of lymphatic fluid that drains from the breast. Affected lymph nodes may feel swollen or tender or develop a lump before a tumor is big enough to be felt in the breast itself. Any pain in the armpit area is a sign to check the area carefully with your fingers. A lump under the armpit is likely to be hard and attached to surrounding tissues, so it doesn't move when you touch it. Or tissue may feel thickened and dense compared with the armpit on the other side. 


 Why it happens: The lymph nodes in the armpit are the closest ones to the breast and can therefore be affected by lymphatic fluid that drains from the area. As breast cancer spreads, this is the first place it's like to metastasize, which is why breast cancer is staged according to whether it's lymph-node positive or negative. 

breast cancer awareness information Thuggizzle Cares

breast cancer awareness information Thuggizzle Cares

breast cancer awareness information Thuggizzle Cares

Women are not alone

 Male breast cancer is a rare condition, accounting for only about 1% of all breast cancers. The American Cancer Society estimates that about 1,970 new cases of breast cancer in men would be diagnosed and that breast cancer would cause approximately 390 deaths in men. Most cases of male breast cancer are detected in men between the ages of 60 and 70, although the condition can develop in men of any age. A man's lifetime risk of developing breast cancer is about 1/10 of 1%, or one in 1,000  

Someone Asked...

"How do I support a loved one who just found out she has breast cancer?"


Be their warrior! A diagnosis of breast cancer is devastating not only for the individual, but also for family and friends. Sometimes, friends and family find it easier to stay away than to get close. It can be challenging to know what to say. A feeling of powerlessness may prevail. Supporting someone who is fighting breast cancer requires the tenacity of a warrior and the gentleness of a friend.  


Don't be afraid to

Ask a cancer victim or their family member how they are feeling or how their treatments are going. Some people think they shouldn't approach the subject because they don't know if it's the right time, there is no such thing as the right time. Just ask, if they don't want to discuss it they will tell you that. On the other hand, they might need to vent so ask only if you truly care and want to hear their response no matter how lengthy it might be. 

Please Know

The person with the breast cancer is not the only one affected. Family members and friends are also influenced by health changes of a loved one.
Here are some tips to help family and friends cope with a loved one's diagnosis:

  • Feel free to ask the doctor questions if you accompany your loved one to appointments. Write your questions down so you don't forget them.
  • Be prepared for changes in your loved one's behavior and mood. Medications, discomforts, and stress may cause your loved one to become depressed, angry, or fatigued.
  • Encourage your loved one to be active and independent, as much as possible, to help her regain a sense of self-reliance and confidence.
  • Be realistic about your own needs. Be sure you are sleeping enough, eating properly, and taking some time off for yourself. It is hard to offer much help when you are exhausted. If you take care of your needs, it may be easier to meet the needs of your loved one. 



Survivor Stories

Breast Cancer survivor story Thuggizzle Cares

Bonnie

 A Stage 3 Breast Cancer Survivor of 3 an a half years I just Met With. Bonnie Went Threw Radiation, Chemo Therapy & Surgery But After Participating In A Private Experimental Study She Didn't Have To Have A Mastectomy. 

Breast Cancer survivor story Thuggizzle Cares

Sandra

 My life will never be the same. I had just had a new baby, my mother had passed 2 years prior, and my dad passed about 8 months prior. Then here comes cancer wow! I was taking and shower a felt a lump in my left breast I didn't have cancer on my mind, not at all. I thought that maybe the lump was from my milk ducts, because I had just had a baby; at least that's what my sister said. The lump began to get sore as I would press it trying squeeze milk from it, but nothing happened. But one day I bought a breast pump and started to pump my breast still no milk. I believe it was the next day when I would have to place tissue inside of my bra to keep the blood that was coming from my nipple from coming through my bra. I then decided that I would make a trip to my OB/GYN. She tried to drain the lump but nothing came threw the needle, which totally frightened me. My OB/GYN told me that this happens often, but I was still scared. As I proceeded with test after test, needle after, the report finally came early one morning when no one but me and my 3 month old daughter were home. The phone ring and I knew when they told me to come into the office and bring 2 people along. I insisted that she tell me over the phone and she complied, saying, "Mrs. McKenzie you have breast cancer." Oh my God, I am going to die? Who will take care of my daughter? Why? What happened? etc.  I had stage 3 breast cancer and my tumor 5 centimeters had grown to almost 6 centimeters within about 2 weeks, with 4+ lymphnodes. I went through chemo, radiation, surgery (double mastectomy) stomach infection, skin break out, you name it. But it was all worth it because God spared my life and I am still here to do what He has called me to do, along with raising my now 2-year-old daughter. Thank you God. This year in Sept. I'll have my reconstruction surgery. I encourage all to stay positive and be strong. You can do it because I did it

 with a 3 month old.    

Breast Cancer survivor story Thuggizzle Cares

Jessica

 I was 26. I had just moved back to my home town to pursue a Masters in Education. As I lay in bed ready to fall asleep, I rested my hand on my chest, almost like I was about to recite the Pledge of Allegiance. I suddenly felt a small marble-like lump on my left breast. I quickly checked the right breast to see if it felt the same, it didn't! That night, I fell asleep praying to God for my health. The next day, I discussed my new discovery with my family, friends and of course my family doctor.   Soon, I was getting a mammogram. As I sat in the waiting room, 2 other women were waiting as well. I thought to myself, according to statistics, one of us sitting here may have breast cancer, and let's face it, it probably won't be me. I'm too young. A couple days later, I was scheduled for a biopsy to remove the tumor. A week later, I was going to get my results. I knew it was nothing. I was happy that morning; I got to miss a day of work, and was planning on coming home and relaxing! Little did I know that morning, my life would change forever.
I cried until I couldn't cry anymore.  A week later, I had a lumpectomy and the surgeon removed 3 lymph nodes. I quickly made an appointment to see an oncologist at the cancer center in Houston, a six hour drive from my hometown. We discussed my options, treatments, and recovery plans. When my oncologist told me I would lose my hair in 3 weeks after my first chemotherapy treatment, I decided to treat myself to a great haircut. I cut it shoulder length; I couldn't go any shorter, although in a couple of weeks it was going to be non-existent. I cried again. I know it's just hair, but it was my hair! Sure enough, like clockwork, within those 3 weeks, it began to fall in chunks, the chemotherapy had taken its toll. Six rounds! Six rounds of chemotherapy, traveling to and from Houston. Now I know I'm stronger than I thought!  My family and friends were very supportive. I got showered with get well cards, flowers, books, pajamas, socks, and my favorite… blankets/throws. There is something about a blanket that makes you feel safe, comforted…. loved. My friends threw me a scarf/hat party. They were to bring me a new hat or scarf, this way I wouldn't have to buy my own. Following the chemotherapy, I had radiation treatment: six weeks, five times a week. It has been 2 years, and I wish I could say it's behind me, but in reality, I'm terrified that the cancer will come back. 

Breast Cancer survivor story Thuggizzle Cares

Carolyn

In October 1996, I was a single working mom of three kids and six grand kids. One night as I was showering I discovered a lump in my left breast. I knew as soon as I felt it, I had cancer. After talking to my family doctor, a surgeon, a plastic surgeon and an oncologist, I decided to have a mastectomy on my left breast with an implant. And a breast reduction on my right breast all at the same time. I was eventually diagnosed with a low stage 2 breast cancer. I had one lymph node and part of another involved. My oncologist treated it aggressively so, I had seven rounds of chemotherapy. Of course I lost my hair and I gained about 40 pounds from all the steroids. My body really felt like it would explode. Also when I went for my first fill on my implant , I woke the next morning and all the saline was under my left arm. My implant had ruptured. I had it removed but not replaced. My daughter Sheryl took care of me because she lived with me. My other two kids Michael and Leslie visited often and brought my grand kids to visit and cheer me up. I kept a sense of humor and my grand kids would tell me I looked like Captain Hook with a bald head, which I did. I believe I survived because of God and prayer and the love and support of family and friends. On March 4, 2011 I took my beautiful daughter Sheryl to the emergency room. She was being treated for a bladder infection. As tests were performed, they discovered that she had a tumor the size of a honey dew melon. She was diagnosed with endometrial cancer which she never knew she had because she passed away on March 13, 2011. Just nine days later. I will never understand why I survived cancer and she did not.My family and I have a huge part of our family missing. And we will never be the same. I know my heart will never heal. Today I am 70 years old and I have a beautiful great grand daughter who has brought great joy to our lives. I just hope and pray that someday there will be a cure for cancer because it is a sneaky and deadly disease that ruins people's lives. Everyone count your blessings and God bless.

Breast Cancer survivor story Thuggizzle Cares

Michelle

I Just Met Breast Cancer Survivor Michelle . She Detected A Lump In Early 2004 And Took Care Of It. She would like everyone to see a doctor right away if there are any abnormal changes in your breast so that you can catch it and get rid of it! 

Breast Cancer survivor story Thuggizzle Cares

Linda

January of 2008 Linda was diagnosed with IDC - Invasive Ductal Carcinoma.   Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), sometimes called infiltrating ductal carcinoma, is the most common type of breast cancer. About 80% of all breast cancers are invasive ductal carcinomas. Invasive means that the cancer has “invaded” or spread to the surrounding breast tissues. Ducthmgfal means that the cancer began in the milk ducts, which are the “pipes” that carry milk from the milk-producing lobules to the nipple. Carcinoma refers to any cancer that begins in the skin or other tissues that cover internal organs such as breast tissue. All together, “invasive ductal carcinoma” refers to cancer that has broken through the wall of the milk duct and begun to invade the tissues of the breast. Over time, invasive ductal carcinoma can spread to the lymph nodes and possibly to other areas of the body. 

Breast Cancer survivor story Thuggizzle Cares

Jan

 I just met Jan a breast cancer survivor. She is a nice lady who does a lot for the community!!

Breast Cancer survivor story Thuggizzle Cares

Coqueace "KoCo"

 This is Coqueace KoCo Powell in mid Jan 2012. She had a double mastectomy, Stage 3b cancer, and a 50/50 chance of survival. Today, this is her with the big smile, implants, and a second chance of living. You ask her can she stand the rain?? Yes..and floods, hurricanes, tsunamis, and any other storm! U heard me?!! ...Thank you Lord for strength of super heroes to fight. Thank you Jesus for another year of her life Thank you everyone for your support!  

Breast Cancer survivor story Thuggizzle Cares

Jennifer

It is important that you read my story because not all breast cancer can be found in the form of lumps.  

 I had just turned 24 years old on June 1, 2008 and my mother had just been diagnosed with DCIS stage 0 breast cancer and needed to have a lumpectomy with radiation to follow. The night she told my brother and I the news, I started hysterically crying. She said that the doctors said she would be fine. I was very upset about this news; however I was more upset because I knew I would be diagnosed with it too. That night I said to my family, I am going to get it. I just had a really bad feeling. Now I know to pay attention to bad feelings.  Two weeks later, my right nipple started to discharge blood. I freaked out. The next day I went to my gynecologist immediately. I had been on birth control pills for 6 years so my breasts were naturally denser. Therefore, I did not think anything could be wrong. She said that although it is rare for young women to experience serious problems with their breasts, I should go have a sonogram done that day. Discharging blood was definitely something to be concerned with. I went to have a sonogram which showed tons of calcium deposits, which sonograms are not supposed to show. I had so many that the radiologist thought it would be a good idea to have a biopsy done that day so they could figure out if I am in real danger. The biopsy showed precancerous cells throughout my milk ducts but they did not know how widespread the cells were. The next week I had a mammogram, an MRI, another biopsy, and a lymph node biopsy, which showed that my right breast had precancerous cells throughout the linings of my milk ducts but it was not invasive. There were no lumps at all. This was not something that could be felt. On July 23, 2008 I was diagnosed with DCIS stage 0 breast cancer and I would need to have a right breast mastectomy.  What I learned from this experience is that no matter how afraid you are, when something does not feel right to you, you need to go to the doctor. Your health is too valuable, and although the doctor might tell you something you don't want to hear, it is better to hear it now before it's too late to do something about it. 

Breast Cancer survivor story Thuggizzle Cares

Ashley

A 15 year old girl named Ashley gets a double mastectomy to battle her breast cancer. This is rare for someone her age, but this is not the only tragedy she's faced this year. Ladies stay aware of any changes in your breast and let you doctor know about them, even if you feel like it is something small that will go away on it own.  

Breast Cancer survivor story Thuggizzle Cares

Rebekah

Its funny how Iv been a part of this group for a couple years and at 27 years old Im here looking for questions I cannot answer. I have finally got the ball rolling and have been informed of a tumor in my right breast so tomorrow I go in to see for ultrasound to see how big this mass is. I fear answers because I know im experiencing pain and so much fatigue all that is left is hope and will to survive. This awareness group is great for support. I can only hope I have caught it in time keep fighting for this cause!